3 Ways to Dramatically Increase Year End Giving

Don't look now, but there are 2 months left to fundraise in 2022.


Yikes.


As the panic of that statement washes over you, remember that you’re not alone in the “Oh Dear God, how on earth did we lose track of time and now we have to scramble quickly” mentality.


A great way to make sure you capture some of that holiday cheer and generosity? Have an end of year solicitation plan.


Need somewhere to start? Here are 3 Ways to Dramatically Increase Your End of Year Giving.


1. Matching Gift Verbiage


One of the best ways to leverage the generosity of your donors at the end of the year is to leverage a matching gift. Whether it is a collection of donations from individuals or a single gift from a business, it is a fantastic opportunity to light a fundraising fire under the rears of your supporters.


But all to often, groups have the same boring way to announce it. More than likely, you’re probably used to hearing “every gift up to $X,XXX will be matched” or some typical variation of that phrasing.


And in a season of giving where there are a ton or nonprofits vying for the attention of potential donors, how do you make your match more interesting or appealing to those looking to make a difference with their gifts?


On a recent webinar we hosted, our guest Vanessa Chase Lockshin of The Story Telling Non-Profit had two fantastic examples of how to re-approach the way a matching gift can be talked about and get folks excited about it too!


Instead of your normal verbiage stating that all gifts will be matched up to a certain amount, try a more compelling angle like:


“Your monthly gift will be matched for the first year of giving.” Not only will you achieve that elusive monthly gift pledge, but knowing that they have a match every month for a year is really intriguing.


Another example is to use something like: “Your $1,000 gift will be matched to help one child.” Not only does the donor get to use a match, but it’s connected to a tangible program or individual and that has a much more powerful and personal attractiveness to a supporter.


Remember, we’re going for clear over clever. No need to get super cute with how you talk about matching gifts, but it does pay to get a bit more creative in how your donors can use and leverage match dollars and you should see an increase in the way your fiscal cheerleaders engage at the end of the year.



2. Make sure you can take all revenue


Ok, we all know that we need a donate button on the top of your website, a place for folks to donate through credit card, and that if someone sends a check or cash that your nonprofit is able to make that a simple and easy process.


But what if a donor wants to give stock? What if they want to give cryptocurrency? What if they want to pay via Venmo? Or they want to give from their Donor Advised Funds?


Is your nonprofit ready to accept any and all payments?


Well, you need to. And get on it as soon as possible!


A lot of donations at the end of the year will come from individuals who are moved by a social media post, article they read online, an appeal that comes in the mail, and are immediately moved to give. But in the heat of the donation moment, if your organization doesn’t have a simple way to conduct that transaction, in the form your donor want to give in, then you are risking them abandoning that gift in favor of giving to someone else, or not giving completely.


Is it expensive to add these components to your site? Nope! Not at all!


Companies like Donor Dock or Every.org have built free applications to use on your website to take all the guesswork out of giving, and allow for any and all types of gifts to be processed for your organization. A quick set up will have you ready to get more gifts with less hassle, allow your nonprofit to have a great way to promote your organization as an inclusive donor hub, and a great talking point to call up supporters to talk about as you connect with them before the end of year.


3. Last Year But Not This Year Donor List Review


Speaking of end of year calls.


When’s the last time you thanked your donors for their support, gave them an update on what your organization has done with their previous gifts, or to just say “hi” and ask how they are doing and if they have any questions about the programs and services you provide to the community?


One of the biggest issues nonprofits have is the massive rush and scramble to build back relationships with those that have supported the organization in the past. As the calendar creeps forward and the 10,000 things you have to do have taken over your day-to-day work life, the maintenance of donor communications take a very back seat.


No wonder the average nonprofit has a 45% donor attrition rate.


If you’re building your 2023 plan currently, and don’t have in big bold letters stating the importance of reaching our regularly to donors throughout the year and not just ask them for money, you’re missing a great way to keep more friends of your organization.


But if you’re at the point where you’re just scrambling to find gifts from warm leads at this moment – they are right in front of you.


Your past donors are the keys to quick wins, but you’re going to have to act fast. And have a bit of apologetic undertones too.


Look at those individuals who gave to you in 2021, but have yet to give to you this year. Start calling that list of folks as your first line of offense when soliciting for end of year gifts.


Need a bit of verbiage to help you with your phone script? I got you.


Try this:


“Hi Steve! This is Patrick from “X” nonprofit, how are you today? First, I want to apologize for not reaching out sooner to share all the incredible things your gifts have helped accomplish over the past year. We made our community better, and it was the help from individuals like you that made it happen. Secondly, I wanted to reach out so personally say THANK YOU for your continued support of our nonprofit. It’s so humbling to be able to make such impact and you’re a huge reason why we can expand our programs and services. Finally, I wanted to invite you to help reach our end of year fundraising goal of “$XX,XXX.” Can we count on you for your continued support of our organization?”


Make sure you personalize this whole script, but as a skeleton it should help you get over that pit-in-the-stomach feeling that you haven’t reached out enough prior to asking for your end of year gift.


From a tweak in your appeal letter, to having multiple options for giving, your end of year campaign can be as successful as you need it to be.


Time to hustle, pick up the phone, grab as many donor coffee meetings as possible and state – with clarity – what your need is.


Clocks ticking gang! You got this!


-Patrick